At a time when a highly infectious biological virus, the coronavirus, is spreading – as is an equally infectious psychological virus, panic – I wanted to take the opportunity to reach out with a message on what we at The Atlas Society are doing to respond to both. First, we are recommitting to core values, including reason, productivity, benevolent self-interest, and achievement.  Reason starts with a recognition that reality exists, that A is A – and in a time when our best epidemiological understanding of the “A” of COVID-19 is evolving, we are taking individual measures with each member of our team to be safe so that we can continue to ramp up the increased impact The Atlas Society has had in engaging the next generation with the ideas of Ayn Rand in creative ways.   Far from backing down or slowing work on any project, we are doubling down on productivity, and taking advantage of this time to work on large-scale projects that require time and thought, such as writing The Pocket Guide to Postmodernism, speeding production of RED PAWN: The Graphic Novel and moving forward on a Hebrew translation of ANTHEM: The Graphic Novel. You’ll hear from me in the coming months with updates on the progress of these projects – and more. Just as Sir Isaac Newton made some of his greatest discoveries in math and physics while self-quarantined during the Great Plague of London (which decimated nearly a quarter of the city's population in 1665-1666),...
Editor's Note: The following is chapter one of J.P. Medved’s novel Justice, Inc. Former Army Ranger Eric Ikenna is the CEO of the powerful, private military corporation, Justice Incorporated. But when his company successfully topples the government of South Sudanese dictator and international war criminal Ahmed al-Bashir, Eric and his operators suddenly become public enemy number one for a very deadly, very secretive branch of the United States government. Combining bleeding-edge technology from tomorrow's wars with heart-pounding, nonstop action,Justice, Inc. is a geo-political military thriller and the first novel in the Justice Incorporated series. Justice, Inc. is part of The Writers Series, our highly popular feature that showcases the work of contemporary novelists influenced by Ayn Rand. “Federal funding for organizations like Helping Hands for Africa thus represents an unalloyed good, even though the returns are measured in lives saved, rather than dollars made.” “Jesus.”  Senator Horace Wilson stopped, and the words scrolling in front of his eyes paused. He flicked his gaze to the picture occupying the bottom right of his vision.  “Jeff, ‘unalloyed?’ Who is this speech for, the United Metalworkers Union? Change it.”  “Yes sir.” The voice in his ears was immediate. “How about ‘indisputable’?”  “You’re the goddamn...
“You know, we eat guys like you for lunch every day of the week.” Those were the words of AT&T Chairman John deButts nearly fifty years ago. He directed them to MCI Chairman Bill McGowan, whose fledgling company had designs on competing with AT&T in the long-distance space. DeButts was properly contemptuous. AT&T controlled 100 percent of the long-distance market at the time, one out of every 500 Americans worked for the communications giant, and arguably most problematic of all for MCI, banks and investment banks generally didn’t want to have anything to do with the businesses that presumed to compete with ‘Ma Bell. Not only was toppling the monopoly seen as a fool’s errand that didn’t rate financing, it was viewed as unwise to anger a corporation that generated more banking fees on an annual basis than just about any other. MCI’s chances of success were quite a bit less than slim to none, only for Michael Milken to enter the picture. We write about Milken after President Trump so correctly pardoned him for “crimes” that had never before been prosecuted. We’d like to think he did so not just to reverse past injustices, but most importantly in honor of Milken’s remarkable capitalistic achievements. Simply stated, it would be hard to find a greater wealth creator and driver of progress than Milken, and his intrepid financing of MCI speaks to this truth. Indeed, there’s an old saying that “banks only lend to you when you don’t need the money.” Milken understood this...
Editor’s Note: Members and friends of The Atlas Society provide us with a wealth of wisdom. Atlas Society supporter Jennifer Bukowsky is an award-winning trial and appellate criminal defense attorney in Columbia, Missouri. She and her husband Brant have two young sons—Blake and Gus Bukowsky. Her second home is on Twitter @esqonfire. Jennifer also shares her views on news, politics, current events & pop culture on her weekly radio and TV show, called, you guessed it, the “Jennifer Bukowsky Show.” MM: You are an Ayn Rand fan. How did you first hear of Rand? I read  Anthem as part of a book club, and afterward I immediately downloaded Atlas Shrugged.  It really blew my mind. I have Ayn Rand on my list of suspected time travelers, and I just loved, loved, loved that book. I’m married to an entrepreneur, and my husband actually got in touch with the producers of the movie Atlas Shrugged Part 2, and helped them with their online advertising in exchange for getting me tickets to the premiere, which fell on my birthday, so we got to attend that in DC. MM: Oh, that’s great! So you were an adult when you first read Rand. That’s kind of a separate little club. JB: Yes, I felt like I was a late bloomer.  I went around the room at one of these dinners and everyone's like, “I read her when I was 14” or “I read her when I was 16.”   MM: I was well into adulthood before I read Ayn Rand for the first time. I’d always heard that...
Donald Trump’s recent pardon of Michael Milken, the so-called junk bond king, has brought out the usual suspects to denounce Milken. John Carroll, one of the federal prosecutors that secured Milken’s guilty plea (more on Carroll later) declared in the Washington Post  that Trump’s action “outraged” him and claimed that the pardon is proof that American “justice” is unjust: What outrages me, and what I think should outrage others, is the process that brought about the pardon. In as guileless an admission as I have ever seen of rich man’s justice, the White House bolstered its decision by listing a murderer’s row of Republican donors and billionaires who provided “widespread and long-standing” support for Milken’s pardon. In fact, what makes this pardon worse, according to Carroll, is that wealthy people—and even Rudy Giuliani himself, the man who led Milken’s prosecution—asked Trump to pardon him. In other words, some of those who have stood up for Milken are wealthy beyond a reasonable doubt, and if their names aren’t George Soros or Kennedy, they should just shut up and count their money. Indeed, I, too, am outraged by Trump’s pardoning Michael Milken, but the cause of my outrage is that Milken should have needed a pardon at all. That he was coerced into a guilty plea—for “crimes” that federal judges later would say were not criminal...

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