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By Katy Grimes  Across America media outlets are promoting various planned marches, rallies and “protests” for President-elect Donald J. Trump’s inauguration January 20.  Project Veritas this week exposed numerous radical groups organizing attacks, planning to incite violence, create transportation shut downs, and commit acts of domestic terrorism during the Deploraball January 19, as well as the Presidential Inauguration January 20. The Washington Times reported Tuesday that ads offering activists up to $2,500 per month to protest the inaugural of...
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Washington, Jan. 20, 2017 I watched Donald J. Trump’s inauguration today with mixed feelings. I didn’t vote for him, even though the prospect of another four years of Obama’s “progressivism” under Hillary was awful. Watching his campaign with disbelief, I thought he was a blend of Peter Keating, demanding attention and affirmation with a hair-trigger intolerance for being dissed; and of Gail Wynand, building power by appealing to the lowest common denominator. Yet I have to admit that, on election eve, my heart lifted when the results cascaded in his favor. It wasn’t just that Hillary lost, and that the commentators and media were so flummoxed. It seemed that something new and promising might actually happen. Two things have boosted that feeling. The first is that Trump has nominated strong, independent, successful people to his cabinet. Rex Tillerson, CEO of Exxon; Andy Puzder, CEO of CKE fast food restaurants; education philanthropist Betsy DeVos—these and his other nominees are not the yes-men sycophants one might have feared, and they are not insiders whose appointment is merely a good bureaucratic career move. The second is my observation of the opposition. I was working at home today, on...
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When President Elect Donald Trump named Ayn Rand as his favorite writer, and The Fountainhead as his favorite book, last spring, few Objectivists took notice.   With his inauguration as the 45th President of the United States tomorrow, perhaps it’s time we should.  Others -- critics of Rand and Trump -- aren’t shying away from the topic.  “Ayn Rand acolyte-Donald Trump stacks his cabinet with fellow objectivists,” wrote Washington Post National Political Correspondent James Hohmann in a piece last month.   At the same time, one prominent Objectivist, Onkar Ghate, called Trump’s election “One Small Step for Dictatorship.” Both positions are exaggerated.  To be objective, let’s start with perspective. In 2009 Obama’s aggressive moves on socializing medicine and raising taxes helped spark a resurgence of interest in Ayn Rand.  Book sales of the 1957 novel Atlas Shrugged doubled over previous-year...
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(Edited from original article published on August 20th, 2010.) She called businessmen "America's persecuted minority." And today—as has been the case at least since the start of the Industrial Revolution—many businessmen and businesswomen feel they are the victims of a special scorn directed at them, not because they cheat or steal but, rather, because they grow wealthy through their own honest efforts by producing goods and services sold to willing customers. Politicians translate this disdain into higher taxes, regulations, and special criminal penalties on these producers.
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“In the broad valley, far below him, in the first sunlight of early morning, he saw a town. Only it was not a town. Towns did not look like that. He had to suspend the possible for a while longer, to seek no questions or explanations, only to look.” The above was Ayn Rand's description of Howard Roark's Monadnock Valley development in The Fountainhead. Rand is revered — and reviled — as a philosopher and novelist, but to me she was also an artist. She defined art as a recreation of reality according to an artist’s values, and in her work, she recreated an inspirational world of heroes, light, and flourishing. That is why The Atlas Society chose art as an arena for intellectual and spiritual engagement with Ayn Rand’s ideas.  The 25-year-old philosophical organization capped 2016 with winners of first annual Atlas Art Contest. Over 400 entries were narrowed down to 21 artists by a panel of four judges:...

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